Interpreters, Compilers, and Learning

[Disclaimer: I know very little about computers and operating systems at this point, as I just started going back to college for my second BS, this time in CS. However, with my background in neuroscience, I can’t help but try to find parallels between what I already know about the brain and the things I’m learning about computers. I realize that the worn analogy of brains and computers doesn’t always hold weight, but as I try to understand the new things I’m learning, I’m going to refer back to things I already know, which is the brain.

As I learn more, I’ll probably update articles. If you have any insight into anything I’ve written, please share with me, as I and my readers love to learn!]

*********

Computers can only execute programs that have been written in low-level languages. However, low-level languages are more difficult to write and take more time. Therefore, people tend to write computer programs in high-level languages, which then must be translated by the computer into low-level languages before the program can be run.

Now, there are two kinds of programs that can process high-level languages into low-level languages: interpreters and compilers.

Interpreters read the high-level program and then executes. It does so by reading the code one line at time, executing between lines. Hence the term INTER (between) in INTERpreter.

Compilers reads the programs and translates it completely before the program runs. That is, the compilers translates the program whole, and then runs it. This is unlike the interpreter’s one-line-at-a-time method.

These aspects of programming got me thinking a bit.

Compilers remind me automatic processes, like when we are operating on auto-pilot. Our brain is still taking in information, but it’s not processing it one bit at a time; it’s more big-picture, and less into the details at a given moment.

However, when we are learning something new, our brains are more focused on the details and more interested in processing things in bits, and then “running” it. That is, when we are struggling with new information, or just ingesting new information, our brains are more apt to take it bits of information at a time, processing it, and then moving on to the new piece of information. That way, if something is not understood, it’s realized early on in the process, and that can be remedied.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply: A few words won't kill ya (plus, it's good for your brain)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s