Refugee Status and the Human Brain

Author's Note: Article originally published in BrainWorld Magazine. Like blood from a wound, refugees pour out of the war-torn nation of Syria. And while international conversation centers on the social and economic toll refugees may have on their adopting countries, very little has been said about how immigration and refugee status may affect the human … Continue reading Refugee Status and the Human Brain

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2015: Manic Monday, Technique Thursday, Findings Friday and Séance Sunday

Yes, it's that time of year again, when we make resolutions and promptly fail at them. But it'll be different this year, you tell yourself. I'll actually keep my resolutions. Yes, yes, of course you will. Since I, like most everyone else, have a positive bias towards myself, I have made the resolution to maintain … Continue reading 2015: Manic Monday, Technique Thursday, Findings Friday and Séance Sunday

Capgras Delusion: Impostors are Everywhere. Or are they?

Impostors, impostors everywhere. Or are they? David was involved in a bad car accident. He sustained head injuries when he landed head-first on the ground. Seemingly, though, he was fine, retaining the capacity to talk and walk. But there was a problem. Whenever David saw his mother, he would say that she looks like my … Continue reading Capgras Delusion: Impostors are Everywhere. Or are they?

Mirrored-Self Misidentification: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, Who I See is not Me at all

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who I see is not me at all. When you look into a mirror, who do you see? Yourself? Not if you have Mirrored-self misidentification, a delusional belief that your reflection in a mirror belongs to a stranger’s. The stranger just happens to look like you. The disorder might be … Continue reading Mirrored-Self Misidentification: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, Who I See is not Me at all

Cognitive Substraction: Why Brain Imaging Techniques aren’t always accurate

In imaging, there are certain methodologies, like the cognitive subtraction methodology. In this method, activity in a control task in subtracted from activity in an experimental task. So for example, take a word task. A simple model of written word recognition is used. In a famous experiment, the Peterson et al. (1988) experiment, they wanted … Continue reading Cognitive Substraction: Why Brain Imaging Techniques aren’t always accurate